Haunted Yorkshire

They're Closer Than You Think!

Yorkshire Dales National Park

“The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown.”

Could there be a world that lies beyond our beliefs?

These are some of the reported sightings and stories of ordinary people, who believe they have had an extraordinary experience!

Some names have been changed for the purpose of this website!

Index

Index of listings

Please scroll down the page.

Middleham Moor
Low Hall Appletreewick
Trollers Gill Appletreewick
Napp Hall Askrigg
Road between Aysgarth and Woodhall Aysgarth
Clapdale Hall Clapdale
Coverham Church
Main Road East Scrafton
Greenhow Hill Stump Cross
Longshaw Moorland Grindlesford
Gunnerside Lodge Gunnerside
Hazelwood Castle Hazlewood
Swinsty Hall
Malt Shovel Public House Oswaldkirk
Ivelet Bridge 
 
  


Middleham Moor

Middleham Moor is haunted by the ghost of a lady in a black dress. Peat cutters are reputed to have discovered a body dressed in the rotting remains of a black shawl. She was meant to have been murdered by one of her admirers after he discovered she was to run away with another man.

 

Low Hall Appletreewick

During the 18th century reports of Low unearthly groans would often knock ornaments from their stands. The witnesses said the noises seemed to be coming from underground deep below the hall. The disturbance was finally exorcised and the noise stopped. To date no explanation can be made.

 

Trollers Gill Appletreewick

A barguest has been seen with glowing red eyes and a yellow tint to its fur.

 

As if this wasn’t enough living beneath the ravine, trolls are said to emerge at night and track down their prey (humans). At least one farmer was lured to his death by their ability to trick people into straying from the road.

Nappa Hall Askrigg

This location is another haunt of the spiritually busy Mary Queen of Scots, who has been seen here wearing a black velvet dress. The sightings seemed to be 1878 before stopping without an explanation.

 

Road Between Aysgarth and Woodhall Aysgarth

In March 1934 a woman dressed in dark Victorian clothing with white gloves and a walking stick was seen walking along this road. Often she has been mistaken for someone living, though she never interacts with witnesses. She’s normally seen around March time and it is rumoured this was around the time of her death.

 

Clapdale Hall Clapdale

This hall once formed part of a castle; numerous reports have suggested this hall is now haunted by Dame Alice Kytell, who was regarded as a witch by locals.

 

Coverham Church

The figure of a black lady is seen rising from her grave in the churchyard, and then sets off to cross the moors until she reaches Curting Wall Corner where she vanishes. It is said that peat cutters once found a skeleton during the 1900s and buried there.

 

Main road through Village East Scrafton

A strange ball of light is said to float down the middle of this road at night, causing motorists to swerve.

 

Greenhow Hill Stump Cross

The roads in the area is said to sometimes play host to the echoes of an invisible pair of clogs that travel the neighbourhood.

 

Longshaw Moorland Grindlesford

While this shuck is said to be just as terrifying, however, a good loud shout is reportedly enough to drive him away with his tail between his legs.

 

Gunnerside Lodge Gunnerside

A woman in black is often seen here who was said to have died in a fire. Could this be the charred remains of the unfortunate woman?

 

Hazlewood Castle Hazlewood

Further Comments: A monk dressed in black is said to haunt the Tansy bedroom and St Margaret's courtyard area. The figure is said to vanish into the yew tree in the courtyard. In 2003 one guest complained she was kept awake at night by a crying baby, even though there were no infants near her room.

 

Swinsty Hall

Swinsty Hall dates from the 16th Century and can be found on the banks of Swinsty Reservoir (built 1874). The house is alleged to be haunted by a man named Robinson who according to legend bought the property with the profits he gained from the sale of goods he looted from the houses of the dead in London during one of the infestations of the bubonic plague.

 

Malt Shovel Public House Oswaldkirk

The Malt Shovel is a Grade II listed building dates from around 1720. Originally built as a house by William Moore, the Malt Shovel has a reputation of being haunted.

IT is reputed to be haunted by the ghost of a little boy who died more than a century ago, aged only five. The boy’s body was kept for weeks in his bedroom at pub before his mother Sally eventually allowed it to be buried.

 

Ivelet Bridge 

The single span Ivelet Bridge over the River Swale dates from 1687 and was an important crossing point on the 16 mile Corpse Way from Muker to the Churchyard at Grinton, which was once the only consecrated burial ground in the dale.

Along the Copse Way were identified resting stops for the men carrying the bodies (usually in wicker baskets). For overnight stops, the bodies were placed in building called a ‘Dead House’, such as can be found at the Punchbowl Inn at Feetham, but for shorter breaks the pall bearers would place the body upon a coffin stone whilst they took a rest. One of these coffin stones is on the north side of Ivelet Bridge.

A headless dog is reputed to haunt the Ivelet Bridge. It silently runs up the bridge before jumping over the wall and diving into the River Swale below. This phantom is considered locally to be an ill omen and a portent of death.